University Health Service

Thank you for scheduling your COVID test at UHS. Here is important information we would like for you to review.

Testing Information

  • All testing performed at UHS will be in our regular medical building at 207 Fletcher St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
  • This will be a deep nasal pharyngeal PCR test.
  • Identify yourself to the check in staff upon arrival. Please wear a mask. If you do not have a mask, one will be provided for you.
  • You will be notified of your results on the patient portal within 24-48 hours. If you are not active on the patient portal, please get signed up for that.
  • If symptomatic or have had a known exposure, please wear your mask and practice social distancing until you have received your results with further instructions.

Housing

  • We understand that housing concerns can be significant when a person has COVID-19, or potentially has COVID-19. We want to make sure your housing needs are met during this time. Students who have been exposed to COVID-19 and are not vaccinated; or those who have possible COVID-19 symptoms, need to isolate safely by having access to a private bedroom and bathroom in order to maintain the distance required to reduce the spread of infection.
  • If you are a student and unable to safely isolate or quarantine, temporary housing may be provided. We can help you determine if this is needed and assist with coordinating. If after hours or your situation changes, contact DPSS at 734-763-1131.

Lab Results-Next Steps

  • Your COVID-19 results will be automatically released to your Patient Portal usually within 24-48 hours. Please make sure you have signed up for the patient portal at myuofmhealth.org.
  • If your test is POSITIVE, it is advised that you remain in isolation until you meet the 3 following criteria: (1) You are without a fever for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication, (2) Your symptoms have improved and (3) 10 days have passed since your positive test. Please note, you may be asked to isolate longer if your symptoms are severe or if you are severely immunocompromised.
  • If your test is NEGATIVE AND you have NOT had a KNOWN CLOSE CONTACT* EXPOSURE, there is nothing further you need to do.
  • If your test is NEGATIVE AND you HAVE HAD A CLOSE CONTACT EXPOSURE, see below:
    • Fully Vaccinated individuals:
      • RECOMMENDED ACTION WEAR A FACE MASK IN PUBLIC INDOOR SETTINGS AND GET TESTING THROUGH UHS 3-5 DAYS AFTER EXPOSURE
        • Wear a face covering while in public indoor settings until you receive a negative test result.
        • Monitor for symptoms for 14 days and contact UHS if symptoms develop at (734) 764-8320.   
    • Unvaccinated individuals: 
      • RECOMMENDED ACTION QUARANTINE FOR 10 DAYS 
      • You have the option to get tested 5-7 days after exposure through UHS. 
      • You should isolate and be re-tested if you develop symptoms of COVID-19 infection.

*Close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, which is defined as being within 6 feet of an infected person for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period (e.g., three 5-minute exposures for a total of 15 minutes), starting from 2 days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, 2 days prior to test specimen collection) until the time the patient is isolated (source: CDC)

  • Symptoms, exposure, and vaccination status will determine our recommendations in other situations.
  • For more information: What to do-On Campus What to do-Off Campus
  • If you are currently employed at the University of Michigan or Michigan Medicine, and your test is positive, please contact Occupational Health at Occupational-health@med.umich.edu or call (734) 764-8021 to report your results.

What if I am immunocompromised?

For those individuals with mild to moderate COVID-19 infection who are at high risk for progressive to severe COVID-19, monoclonal antibody therapy may help to reduce their risk for hospitalization or worsening illness. To be eligible, you must be at home (not in the hospital) and early in their illness. For more details and eligibility criteria.

In addition, the FDA has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for monoclonal antibody therapy those 12 yo and older with a close contact exposure to COVID-19 with either risk for inadequate antibody response to vaccination, or not fully vaccinated with risk factors for progression to severe disease. For more details and eligibility criteria.

If you have read these criteria and feel you may be a candidate for monoclonal antibody therapy, please call UHS at 734-764-8320.

Treating Symptoms

Symptoms of COVID-19 can present similarly to other infections or conditions such as a common cold, the flu, strep throat, mono, etc. If your symptoms are more than mild, please call UHS at 734-764-8320 for a clinician appointment. Below are some general care recommendations and over-the-counter treatments to help with your symptoms:

Fever

  • A fever is a high body temperature. It's one way your body fights being sick. A fever shows that the body is responding to infection or other illnesses, both minor and severe. A fever is a symptom, not an illness by itself. A fever can be a sign that you are ill, but most fevers are not caused by a serious problem.
    You may have a fever with a minor illness, such as a cold. But sometimes a very serious infection may cause little or no fever. It is important to look at other symptoms, other conditions you have, and how you feel in general.
  • A normal body temperature is about 98.6ºF. Some people have a normal temperature that is a little higher or a little lower than this. A core temperature of 100.4°F or above is considered a fever.
  • To prevent dehydration, drink plenty of fluids. Choose water and other caffeine-free clear liquids until you feel better. If you have kidney, heart, or liver disease and have to limit fluids, talk with your doctor before you increase the amount of fluids you drink.
  • Ibuprofen 600mg every 8 hours (do not exceed 3200 mg/day) (e.g. Motrin, Advil), or Acetaminophen up to 1000 mg every 6 hours (do not exceed 3,000 mg/day) (e.g. Tylenol) or generic versions of these medicines. Ibuprofen may irritate the stomach, so take with food. Sponge your body with lukewarm water to help with fever. Don't use cold water or ice.
  • Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if symptoms worsen, fever persists or you do not get better as expected.
  • To learn more about "Learning About Fever", log into your MyUofMHealth.org account at http://www.MyUofMHealth.org then go to the "Search Health Library" box and enter G732 in the search box.

Pain (headache/body aches)

If pain persists or worsens, be sure to contact your doctor.

  • Ibuprofen 600mg every 8 hours (do not exceed 3200 mg/day) (e.g. Motrin, Advil), or Acetaminophen up to 1000 mg every 6 hours (do not exceed 3,000 mg/day) (e.g. Tylenol) or generic versions of these medicines. Ibuprofen may irritate the stomach, so take with food.

*If pain persists or worsens, be sure to contact your doctor.

Cough

  • A cough is your body's response to something that bothers your throat or airways. Many things can cause a cough. You might cough because of a cold or the flu, bronchitis, or asthma. Smoking, postnasal drip, allergies, and stomach acid that backs up into your throat also can cause coughs.
  • A cough is a symptom, not a disease. Most coughs stop when the cause, such as a cold, goes away. You can take a few steps at home to cough less and feel better.
  • Cough suppressants (e.g. Robitussin DM, Delsym 12-hour) reduce sensitivity to the cough reflex so you cough less. This can be helpful for coughing that is keeping you up at night.
  • Drink lots of water and other fluids. This helps thin the mucus and soothes a dry or sore throat. Honey or lemon juice in hot water or tea may ease a dry cough.
  • Prop up your head on pillows to help you breathe and ease a dry cough.
  • Try cough drops to soothe a dry or sore throat. Cough drops don't stop a cough. Medicine-flavored cough drops are no better than candy-flavored drops or hard candy.

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

  • You cough up blood.
  • You have new or worse trouble breathing.
  • You have a new or higher fever.
  • You have a new rash.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

  • You cough more deeply or more often, especially if you notice more mucus or a change in the color of your mucus.
  • You have new symptoms, such as a sore throat, an earache, or sinus pain.
  • You do not get better as expected.

To learn more about "Cough: Care Instructions", log into your MyUofMHealth.org account at http://www.MyUofMHealth.org then go to the "Search Health Library" box and enter D279 in the search box.

Nasal Congestion

  • An upper respiratory infection, or URI, is an infection of the nose, sinuses, or throat. URIs are spread by coughs, sneezes, and direct contact. The common cold is the most frequent kind of URI. The flu and sinus infections are other kinds of URIs.
  • Almost all URIs are caused by viruses. Antibiotics won't cure them. But you can treat most infections with home care. This may include drinking lots of fluids and taking over-the-counter pain medicine. You will probably feel better in 4 to 10 days.
  • Decongestants(e.g. Sudafed or Pseudoephedrine) make breathing through the nasal passages easier by drying mucus and helping to reduce congestion in the ears. These medications can act as a stimulant, and can increase heart rate or blood pressure. These should be avoided in those with high blood pressure.
  • You can also use nasal sprays to aid with congestion. Intranasal decongestant spray: Oxymetazoline (eg. Afrin) 0.05% makes breathing through the nasal passages easier by narrowing the blood vessels in the nose area, reducing swelling and congestion. Not advised for more than 3 days because they may actually increase congestion after 3 days of use (called "rebound effect").
  • Intranasal steroid sprays: (e.g. Flonase, Rhinocort, Nasonex) can relieve allergy symptoms such as stuffy/runny nose, itching, and sneezing. It works by reducing swelling and by blocking the effects of allergens (such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites, mold).

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

  • You seem to be getting much sicker.
  • You have new or worse trouble breathing.
  • You have a new or higher fever.
  • You have a new rash.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

  • You have a new symptom, such as a sore throat, an earache, or sinus pain.
  • You cough more deeply or more often, especially if you notice more mucus or a change in the color of your mucus.
  • You do not get better as expected.
    • For more information about the common cold and runny nose click here
    • To learn more about "Upper Respiratory Infection (Cold): Care Instructions", log into your MyUofMHealth.org account then go to the "Search Health Library" box and enter K520 in the search box.

Thick Mucus

  • Mucolytics like Guaifenesin (Mucinex) are medications used to thin out mucus and can make it easier to clear mucus from the head, throat, and lungs. In addition, sinus rinses can be helpful to thin or clear mucus.

Sinus pain or pressure

  • Ibuprofen 600mg every 8 hours (do not exceed 3200 mg/day) (e.g. Motrin, Advil), or Acetaminophen up to 1000 mg every 6 hours (do not exceed 3,000 mg/day) (e.g. Tylenol) or generic versions of these medicines. Ibuprofen may irritate the stomach, so take with food.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if your symptoms worsen or you do not get better as expected.

For more information about sinus pain/pressure or sinus infections click here
 

Sore throat

  • Infection by bacteria or a virus causes most sore throats. Cigarette smoke, dry air, air pollution, allergies, and yelling can also cause a sore throat. Sore throats can be painful and annoying. Fortunately, most sore throats go away on their own.
  • Warm salt water gargles, using 1 tsp of salt in 8 ounces of water. May do salt water gargles up to every hour as needed. 
  • Ibuprofen 600mg every 8 hours (do not exceed 3200 mg/day) (e.g. Motrin, Advil), or Acetaminophen up to 1000 mg every 6 hours (do not exceed 3,000 mg/day) (e.g. Tylenol) or generic versions of these medicines. Ibuprofen may irritate the stomach, so take with food. 
  • Be careful when taking over-the-counter cold or flu medicines and Tylenol at the same time. Many of these medicines have acetaminophen, which is Tylenol. Read the labels to make sure that you are not taking more than the recommended dose. Too much acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be harmful.
  • Drinking liquids will help to keep your throat moist and your mucus thin.  You can also keep your throat moist by using a vaporizer or sucking on sore throat lozenges, ice, or popsicles. 

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

  • You have new or worse trouble swallowing.
  • Your sore throat gets much worse on one side.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if you do not get better as expected.

Click here for additional sore throat information

To learn more about "Sore Throat: Care Instructions", log into your MyUofMHealth.org account, then go to the "Search Health Library" box and enter U420 in the search box.
 

Allergy Symptoms(runny nose, itchy nose, watery or itchy eyes)

  • Allergies occur when your body's defense system (immune system) overreacts to certain substances. The immune system treats a harmless substance as if it were a harmful germ or virus. Many things can cause this overreaction, including pollens, medicine, food, dust, animal dander, and mold. Allergies can be mild or severe. Mild allergies can be managed with home treatment. But medicine may be needed to prevent problems.
  •  Antihistamines: (e.g Allegra, Zyrtec, Claritin, Xyzal, Benadryl) dry mucous membranes and make breathing easier.  May cause dryness of the nose and mouth.  Some antihistamines may cause drowsiness, and should not be used while driving or operating machinery. 
  • Allergy eye drops (e.g. Optivar, Patanol) can help dry and soothe watery or itchy eyes related to allergies. 
  • Intranasal steroid sprays (e.g. Flonase, Rhinocort, Nasonex) can relieve allergy symptoms such as stuffy/runny nose, itching, and sneezing. It works by reducing swelling and by blocking the effects of allergens (such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites, mold).

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:
You have symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as:

  • A rash or hives (raised, red areas on the skin).
  • Itching.
  • Swelling.
  • Belly pain, nausea, or vomiting.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if you do not get better as expected.

For more information on Allergies click here

To learn more about "Allergies: Care Instructions", log into your MyUofMHealth.org account, then go to the "Search Health Library" box and enter W171 in the search box.

Diarrhea or Loose Stools

  • Diarrhea is loose, watery stools (bowel movements). The exact cause is often hard to find. Sometimes diarrhea is your body's way of getting rid of what caused an upset stomach. Viruses, food poisoning, and many medicines can cause diarrhea. Some people get diarrhea in response to emotional stress, anxiety, or certain foods.
  • Remain well hydrated by drinking lots of fluids (water is best, but tea, Gatorade, ginger ale, or other non-sugary sports drink is acceptable). Limit your diet to broths, saltine crackers, and broiled or baked foods until your diarrhea resolves.  
  • Stick to a BRAT diet (banana, rice, applesauce, and toast) if you have significant nausea.  
  • Use a heating pad on the abdomen to help decrease abdominal discomfort.

Call your doctor now or seek immediate medical care if:

  • You are dizzy or lightheaded, or you feel like you may faint.
  • Your stools are black and look like tar, or they have streaks of blood.
  • You have new or worse belly pain.
  • You have symptoms of dehydration, such as:
    • Dry eyes and a dry mouth.
    • Passing only a little dark urine.
    • Feeling thirstier than usual.
    • You have a new or higher fever.

Watch closely for changes in your health, and be sure to contact your doctor if:

  • Your diarrhea is getting worse.
  • You see pus in the diarrhea.
  • You are not getting better after 2 days (48 hours).

To learn more about "Diarrhea: Care Instructions", log into your MyUofMHealth.org account, then go to the "Search Health Library" box and enter W335 in the search box. 

Anosmia (loss of taste/smell)

  • Many illnesses and injuries can cause taste and smell disorders, including colds and head injuries
  • About 4-5 out of 10 people (44%) with COVID-19 have reported a decrease in taste or smell. In most cases, this started suddenly, lasted a short time and the affected person quickly returned to their previous state.
  • If your decrease in smell or taste lasts more than 2 weeks, smell training may be helpful. Smell training is a way of stimulating the olfactory nerve that helps you to smell

For more information about loss of smell related to COVID click here

Mental Health Support

Resources

  • Dean of Students Office (DOS)  provides  support with academic concerns, financial issues, housing, meals, etc. If you are unable to isolate safely at home, DOS will discuss your options and potentially coordinate temporary isolation housing.  Call 734-764-7420, or email as backup (DOSCOVIDCareTeam@umich.edu) for more information.  
  • The Division of Public Safety and Security (DPSS) can provide transportation to and from UHS for COVID evaluation/testing if you do not have your own car and aren’t able to walk/bike. To request a ride, call DPSS directly at (734) 763-1131.
  • Contact Tracing Corps (CTC) for questions about exposure and your quarantine period, you may contact them at 734-647-0001.
  • Occupational Health Service (OHS) If you are currently employed at the University of Michigan or Michigan Medicine, and your test is positive, please contact Occupational Health at Occupational-health@med.umich.edu or call  (734) 764-8021 to report your results.
  • U-M COVID-19 Community Sampling and Tracking Program (CSTP) is a free, asymptomatic testing program for all U-M students, faculty and staff on the Ann Arbor campus.   We would encourage students and staff to use CSTP for routine screening.     Students who do not submit proof of vaccination and/or who are not considered fully vaccinated are required to participate in weekly COVID-19 testing. Weekly COVID-19 testing must be administered by University Health Service (UHS: symptomatic) or the Community Sampling and Tracking Program (CSTP: asymptomatic).  Once registered for the program, you can schedule your testing at a time and location that is convenient for you. To register and schedule your testing, please go to the CSTP website 
  • Maize and Blue Cupboard provides free food (as well as cleaning and household supplies) to UM students. There is no application/verification process and the space is set up in a grocery store style so you can take what you need and what works for you. Staff can assist with applying for SNAP benefits (food stamps). Services are free and confidential.
  • Food Gatherers is a local non-profit that provides free food across Washtenaw County. Learn more and see a map of pickup sites here
  • Grocery Delivery
    • Shipt
    • Instacart
    • Meijer
    • Kroger app (options for delivery and shipping)
    • WholeFoods through Amazon (doesn’t require Prime; many affordable store brand options)

General COVID-19 Information

Learning About Coronavirus (COVID-19)
Coronavirus (COVID-19): Overview

What is coronavirus (COVID-19)?
The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by a virus. It is an illness that was first found in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. It has since spread worldwide.

The virus can cause fever, cough, and trouble breathing. In severe cases, it can cause pneumonia and make it hard to breathe without help. It can cause death.

Coronaviruses are a large group of viruses. They cause the common cold. They also cause more serious illnesses like Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). COVID-19 is caused by a novel coronavirus. That means it's a new type that has not been seen in people before.

This virus spreads person-to-person through droplets from coughing and sneezing. It can also spread when you are close to someone who is infected. And it can spread when you touch something that has the virus on it, such as a doorknob or a tabletop.

What can you do to protect yourself from coronavirus (COVID-19)?
The best way to protect yourself from getting sick is to:

  • Avoid areas where there is an outbreak.
  • Avoid contact with people who may be infected.
  • Wash your hands often with soap or alcohol-based hand sanitizers.
  • Avoid crowds and try to stay at least 6 feet away from other people.
  • Wash your hands often, especially after you cough or sneeze. Use soap and water, and scrub for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren't available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your mouth, nose, and eyes.

What can you do to avoid spreading the virus to others?
To help avoid spreading the virus to others:

  • Cover your mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Use a disinfectant to clean things that you touch often.
  • Wear a cloth face cover if you have to go to public areas.
  • Stay home if you are sick or have been exposed to the virus. Don't go to school, work, or public areas. And don't use public transportation, ride-shares, or taxis unless you have no choice.
  • If you are sick:
    • Leave your home only if you need to get medical care. But call the doctor's office first so they know you're coming. And wear a face cover.
    • Wear the face cover whenever you're around other people. It can help stop the spread of the virus when you cough or sneeze.
    • Clean and disinfect your home every day. Use household cleaners and disinfectant wipes or sprays. Take special care to clean things that you grab with your hands. These include doorknobs, remote controls, phones, and handles on your refrigerator and microwave. And don't forget countertops, tabletops, bathrooms, and computer keyboards.

When to call for help
Call 911 anytime you think you may need emergency care. For example, call if:

  • You have severe trouble breathing. (You can't talk at all.)
  • You have constant chest pain or pressure.
  • You are severely dizzy or lightheaded.
  • You are confused or can't think clearly.
  • Your face and lips have a blue color.
  • You pass out (lose consciousness) or are very hard to wake up.

Call your doctor now if you develop symptoms such as:

  • Shortness of breath.
  • Fever.
  • Cough.

If you need to get care, call ahead to the doctor's office for instructions before you go. Make sure you wear a face cover to prevent exposing other people to the virus.

Where can you get the latest information?
The following health organizations are tracking and studying this virus. Their websites contain the most up-to-date information. You'll also learn what to do if you think you may have been exposed to the virus.

Current as of: May 8, 2020
Content Version: 12.5
© 2006-2020 Healthwise, Incorporated. 

Your Michigan Medicine doctor or other health care provider has given you these instructions because they are a very important part of your care at Michigan Medicine. Following all of the instructions will give you the best chance of improving your health. It is your responsibility to follow all of these care instructions. Contact your doctor or other provider if you are not sure that you understand any of these instructions or if you have questions about your medical condition. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information.

Tips for Isolation

  • Stay home.  Don't go to school, work, or public areas. And don't use public transportation, ride-shares, or taxis unless you have no choice. Leave your home only if you need to get medical care. But call the doctor's office first so they know you're coming. And wear a cloth face cover.
  • Ask before leaving isolation.  Talk with your doctor or other health professional about when it will be safe for you to leave isolation.
  • Wear a cloth face cover when you are around other people.  It can help stop the spread of the virus when you cough or sneeze.
  • Limit contact with people in your home.  If possible, stay in a separate bedroom and use a separate bathroom. Limit time spent in shared spaces. If needing to enter shared space, wear a mask and wash hands.
  • Avoid contact with pets and other animals.  If possible, have a friend or family member care for them while you're sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.  Then throw the tissue in the trash right away.
  • Wash your hands often, especially after you cough or sneeze.  Use soap and water, and scrub for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water aren't available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Don't share personal household items.  These include bedding, towels, cups and glasses, and eating utensils.
  • Clean and disinfect your home every day.  Use household cleaners or disinfectant wipes or sprays. Take special care to clean things that you grab with your hands. These include doorknobs, remote controls, phones, and handles on your refrigerator and microwave. And don't forget countertops, tabletops, bathrooms, and computer keyboards.

General Cold Care Information

Common Cold and Runny Nose
 
Antibiotics cannot cure the common cold. The common cold is one of the most frequent reasons children miss school and adults miss work. Every year, adults have an average of 2–3 colds, and children have even more.

When you have a cold, mucus fills your nose, causing runny nose, congestion, and mucus to drip down your throat (post-nasal drip), which can cause a sore throat and cough.

What are the causes of the common cold? 

More than 200 viruses can cause the common cold, and infections can spread from person to person through the air and close personal contact. Antibiotics do not work against these viruses and do not help you feel better if you have a cold. Rhinovirus is the most common type of virus that causes colds.
 
What are some risk factors for the common cold?
There are many things that can increase your risk for the common cold, including:

  • Exposure to someone with the common cold
  • Age (infants and young children are at higher risk for colds)
  • A weakened immune system or taking drugs that weaken the immune system
  • Season (colds are more common during the fall and winter)

What are the signs and symptoms of the common cold?
When germs that cause colds first infect the nose and sinuses (air-filled pockets in the face), the nose makes clear mucus. This helps wash the germs from the nose and sinuses. After two or three days, mucus may change to a white, yellow, or green color. This is normal and does not mean you or your child needs antibiotics. Other signs and symptoms of the common cold can include:

  • Sneezing
  • Stuffy nose
  • Sore throat
  • Coughing
  • Post-nasal drip (mucus dripping down your throat)
  • Watery eyes
  • Mild headache
  • Mild body aches

These symptoms usually peak within 2-3 days but can last for up to 10-14 days.
 
When should I seek medical care?
See a clinician if you or your child has any of the following symptoms:

  • Symptoms that last more than 10 days without improvement
  • Symptoms that are severe or unusual

How is the common cold diagnosed and treated?
Antibiotics are not needed to treat a cold or runny nose, which almost always gets better on its own. Your clinician will determine what type of illness you or your child has by asking about symptoms and doing a physical examination. Sometimes they will also swab the inside of your nose or mouth.
Since the common cold is caused by viruses, antibiotics will not help it get better and may even cause harm in both children and adults. Your clinician can give you tips to help with symptoms like fever and coughing.
 
How can I relieve my symptoms?
Rest, over-the-counter medicines and other self-care methods may help you or your child feel better. For more information about symptom relief, talk to your clinician, including your pharmacist. Remember, always use over-the-counter products as directed. Many over-the-counter products are not recommended for children of certain ages.
 
How can I prevent the common cold?
There are steps you can take to help prevent getting a cold, including:

  • Practice good hand hygiene
  • Avoid close contact with people who have colds or other upper respiratory infections

Last Revised: November 2017
Approved by: Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
Disclaimer: This document contains information and/or instructional materials developed by Michigan Medicine for the typical patient with your condition. It may include links to online content that was not created by Michigan Medicine and for which Michigan Medicine does not assume responsibility. It does not replace medical advice from your health care provider because your experience may differ from that of the typical patient. Talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about this document, your condition or your treatment plan.