University Health Service

Safer Sex Supplies

Condoms and other products for safer sex:

Please note: our typical station for safer sex items is temporarily unavailable at Wolverine Wellness due to COVID-related precautions. Individual bags of pre-assorted condoms and lubricant, or dental dams and lubricant, are available free for students outside Wolverine Wellness on the ground floor of UHS. We thank you for sanitizing your hands and maintaining social distancing when picking up safer sex items.

colorful condoms


Your Health Care Kit

It's 2 AM and you're feeling feverish -- got a thermometer?  We recommend that you have a health care kit so you can be ready. Here are suggestions. 


Communication

Communication is a key aspect of all relationships. Some people communicate very directly, while others are more subtle. Learning about the communication styles of you and your partner(s) can help you navigate conversations about relationships and sex. To learn more about communication styles, visit http://serenityonlinetherapy.com/assertiveness.htm.

Everybody Matters

Some ways of communicating are less conducive to equality in a relationship. 


Making Decisions about Dating and Sex

At some point, many students make choices about whether to date or hang out with someone, or whether or not to have sex. When you decide based on your values, and when you've considered what you do and don't want, you're more likely to feel good about your decision. And remember, it's always OK to change your mind.

 


Weight Stigma

—Weight bias refers to:
  • Attitudes that negatively affect our interpersonal interactions
  • Stereotypes ascribed to overweight and larger bodied individuals that increases their vulnerability, unfair treatment, prejudice, and discrimination

—Stigmatizing attitudes toward obese individuals usually emerge when people believe that excess weight is controllable and is a problem of lack of personal responsibility (Brownell et al., 2009)


Healthy Relationships

Healthy relationships include acting in accordance with your values, knowing and respecting boundaries (both yours and your partners’), and consent.

Healthy romantic and sexual relationships can take many different forms. Some people like to date one person, while others prefer to date several people, or none at all. Relationships can include more than two people. Romantic relationships may or may not include sex. Any of these relationship styles can be healthy, as long as all involved feel like their needs and wants are being respected.


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